Movember: Men's Health Awareness

Nearly half of American men will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. Men are also four times as likely to commit suicide. These are the issues plaguing men in America, and these are the issues Movember supports.

This November, remember to check your male friends, brothers, fathers and sons. These issues affect men in vast numbers, but we are not paying attention to them.

Prostate Cancer

Men are likely to develop prostate cancer with age. Before the age of 40, prostate cancer is extremely rare. But as men age, nearly 80% of men over 80 will have cancer cells present in their prostate.

But the good news is, early detection is the key to a 95% survival rate. An annual physical exam with a prostate check is vital to early detection. If you don’t have any heightened risk factors, begin getting annual PSA tests after turning 50.

Some signs of prostate cancer are the need to urinate frequently, difficulty urinating, burning, and blood in urine or semen.

Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer is more common in young men. Because we don’t realize that it can affect men as young as 15, this disease can go undiagnosed. It can be hereditary, meaning those related to someone who has had testicular cancer are at a higher risk.

It can also affect men of color at higher numbers. According to The Movember Foundation, African American men are more likely to develop prostate cancer at an even younger age.

If you don’t know how to check for testicular cancer, here is a quick read from the Movember Foundation about self-examinations!

Suicide

Suicide is one of the leading causes of premature death among men in the United States. Men are four times as likely to commit suicide, because they do not speak out when they need help.

Undiagnosed mental illness is one reason why men tend to commit suicide more frequently than women. Some signs of suicidal tendencies are use of drugs or alcohol, reckless behavior, and isolating themselves. Irregular sleeping patterns, loss of interest, anxiety, and irritability are also signs.

Relationship issues, financial troubles, drug abuses, and crises are the main causes of male suicide. If you or your loved one is going through any of these issues, make yourself available to them to talk.

We want all our loved ones to live long, healthy, and happy lives. But these three diseases affect men at high numbers because they don’t know who to turn to, or what to look for. This November, remind your loved one to get checked. And speak up if they have a mental health issue they need help with.

If you or someone you know may commit suicide, call the Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255.