5 Ways to Get Creative With Gauze

Have you ever wondered how the modern gauze came to be, where it came from, and how we decided its usefulness?

Probably not. But at ExpressMed, wondering about different medical products is our job!

So of course, when we were thinking about the most commonly used medical products during the summer we thought about this little item. From road rash to gashed knees in the pool, it’s used in a multitude of medical settings. 

As simple as it sounds, it has an interesting medical history. And because of that, there are a bunch of really surprising ways it has been used in the past and can still work today.

We scoured the internet and rounded up 5 fun facts and creative uses of gauze, so check out how you can use it outside your first aid kit.

Gauze as Clothes?

In our deep dive of the history of this product, we were able to track down early gauze prototypes. Off cuts of silk created the early forms of gauze because it was the most accessible material. Later, manufacturers began using cotton due to cost.

Both materials are primarily for clothing both then and now. So essentially, silk gauze and even the modern cotton could be used for a patch should you get a sudden hole in your shirt — just another reason to always carry a first aid kit.

In more seasonal use, if you need to create a halloween costume in a hurry, wrap yourself up in roll and get it a little dirty for an on-the-fly mummy costume.

Household Maintenance

Using gauze pads instead of cotton rounds to clean the nail polish off your nails is more effective. Because of its open weave it’s slightly more abrasive, removing tough polish from your nails.

Similarly, you can use them to remove makeup. Again, the open weave allows it to scrub the makeup from your skin without being too rough. They also have a larger surface area than smaller cotton rounds, so you’ll use less of it.

Spiderweb Wound Care

Okay this isn’t so much of a creative use as it is a surprising fact. Before silk and cotton were more accessible, people figured out that spiderwebs were really effective in clotting blood due to the high levels of vitamin K and protein.

Before gauze, people used spider webs to dress wounds, as it is high in protein and vitamin K. Vitamin K is especially useful in helping blood clot, so this was an early form of wound dressing.

Decoration

Sheer gauze is a great halloween decor element because you can use them for lots of different things. Curtains, spiderwebs, tablecloths, and spooky ghosts! It’s an easy inexpensive halloween decor trick.

Since gauze is a lightweight cotton, there’s nothing stopping you from painting a gauze roll your favorite color and using it for wispy curtains year round.

Wound Care, Obivously

This isn’t a weird use, but an obvious one. Gauze has evolved from spiderwebs, to off cuts of silk from clothes, to the modern sterile roll or bandage that we use today. That’s a huge advancement in wound care! So for every scrape, cut, and burn you should always keep gauze on hand in your first aid kit.

But just because you’re using it how intended doesn’t mean you can’t make funny shapes with your rolls or adhesives! Wrap the gauze around a wound in a wild shape and have fun with it. Cut the adhesive into a star shape for a fun spin on perhaps a painful wound.

At ExpressMed, we carry all shapes, sizes, sterility, adhesive, and more types from the leading brands. Whatever you use gauze for, we want you to have fun with your first aid choices. We understand that first aid is a necessity, but we hope that you get creative with your wound care.

As always, share with us the weird and wacky ways you can use this small and practical wound care item!