Which thoughts come into your head when you see a pair of compression socks on sale? Do you think that they’re just for people living with diabetes and pregnant women? If so, please allow us a few moments to talk about another group of people who may benefit from using them. The information we have may just broaden your point of view, especially if you enjoy exercising:

 

As this Scientific American™ article from 2006 proves, the medical community has long known about lactic acid. It’s a byproduct of exercise that may lead to lactic acidosis unless preventive measures are taken. Wearing compression socks is one of those preventive measures. If worn correctly, they’ll help move a person’s blood and oxygen intake along, thereby helping the body maintain appropriate levels of lactic acid.

 

Of course wearing compression socks alone won’t stave off or completely reverse lactic acid buildup because it affects the whole body. So, areas above the compression socks must be addresses too. Oftentimes, this is done by increasing fluid intake before, during and after exercise routines. Warm up and cool down stretches as well as maintaining a balanced lifestyle traditionally helps keep levels low as well.

 

Some people also enjoy wearing compression gloves. The gloves work similar to compression socks. However, there are obviously design differences. For example, many of the compression gloves are missing fingertips. This makes them ideal for treadmill, bike and elliptical machines that have built-in, fingertip activated, pulse monitors. Furthermore, they make using an iPod or other touchpad device during exercise easy.

 

Keep in mind that many pairs of compression socks are long enough to rest just below a person’s knee cap. Others are crew and quarter length. Plus, there are boxes of compression bandages available that may be used to increase pressure on the legs or extend the areas covered by the socks. So, fitness buffs may alter the compression socks and gloves accordingly. To learn more, please contact us.